SSOE Group

Count Your Way to Safety

Consider the following scenario:
The lights are out, it is totally dark and you can’t see. You smell smoke and there is a fire. You must evacuate and escape. Now close your eyes for 10 seconds and mentally find your way to safety. Did you remember that doorway? That wall? That step? That desk? That machine? Other obstacles? Were you able to negotiate your way to safety? Continue reading →

Plan Ahead for Holiday and Winter Travel

The holidays are fast approaching and so is the need to prepare and protect yourself during the hazardous winter driving ahead. Your car needs to be mechanically fit and you need to be mentally prepared for the travel ahead of you.

Think about your family and friends that are counting on you to deliver them safely during the cold, ice, and snow over the winter months. Consider others who have not planned ahead and are not cautious drivers. They are the drivers you will have to be ready to avoid on the slippery winter roads. Continue reading →

“For Safety’s Sake – Do Something!”

Everyday activities including work, play, school, shopping, travel, and just about everything we do involves some sort of safety risk. So how do we protect ourselves and others from these potential injuries?

By far the most important way to prevent injuries is to train ourselves to be vigilant and be able to recognize conditions that could cause injury to ourselves and others. It’s great to be able to recognize and avoid injuries, but that is not enough!

What do we do after that? Do we just walk on by? Do we tell someone or file an Incident Report? Still not enough!

If possible, you should try to “Do Something” to eliminate that risk. Continue reading →

Why Do You Work Safely?

In order to deliberately do something day after day you need a reason. You eat because you need food to live. You sleep because your body needs the rest. You go to work to provide for yourself and your family.

Have you stopped to think about your reasons for working safely? Do you go along with safety regulations because OSHA and the company say so, or to win recognition for being accident free? Stop and think – you have far better reasons for working safely, and here are only a few examples: Continue reading →

Office Electrical Safety

What Are The Hazards? Fire and Electrocution are the two main hazards associated with Office Electrical Safety. Overloaded circuits can also cause power loss, work interruptions, and loss of productivity. A “rats nest” of tangled electrical cords not only creates a fire hazard but also a personal injury risk from slips / trips / falls. Many personal offices, cubicles, and work areas are not set up to handle the additional electrical load from items such as space heaters, fans, coffee makers, and printers. Continue reading →

Lightning Safety

If you hear thunder, then lightning is close enough to strike you – immediately move to safe shelter. A safe shelter is a substantial building or inside an enclosed, metal-topped vehicle. Stay in safe shelter at least 30 minutes after you hear the last clap of thunder.

Indoor Lightning Safety Tips
Continue reading →

Safety for New Workers

Why is safety training so important to new workers and / or to someone who is moving into a new job or position? New workers are 5 times more likely to be injured on the job than experienced workers, and most of those injuries occur within 90 days after starting a new job. Here is a sobering example from a newly released fatality report that describes a such an incident: Continue reading →

Household Hazardous Waste

Most factories and offices have a plan to deal with hazardous waste, but very few households have a similar plan to safely dispose of hazardous products. Batteries, cleaners, pesticides, light bulbs, and even medications are only a few items that should be disposed of properly and NOT flushed down a drain or placed in the garbage where they could potentially contaminate the streams and groundwater. Continue reading →

Water. Rest. Shade.

Heat is the number one weather-related killer in the United States, resulting in hundreds of fatalities each year. Be able to recognize the symptoms of heat related emergencies and know how to respond. Working in hot and humid weather, being in the sun, and doing hard physical work are things that need to be taken seriously. You are also at risk while doing yard work, playing sports, and other leisure activities. Continue reading →

Injuries Are Like a Flat Tire

Consider this: you walk out to your car and you see that one of your tires is flat. You immediately think that the flat tire is the problem. That is incorrect. The fact that your tire is flat is NOT the problem. The fact that your tire is flat is the condition. The problem is that you no longer have enough air in the tire which has caused it to go flat. Continue reading →

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